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Oxford Raspberry Jam - Jan 2013

Posted by Pete Wood on

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Fantastic turn out for the first Raspberry Jam Oxford of 2013, thanks to all that attended.

Raspberry Jam's bring together Raspberry Pi enthusiasts and even those who would like to learn more about Raspberry Pi, and how to get the best out of it. This is a quick round up of some of the show and tells this month that included a Raspberry Pi Powered 3D Printer and an Electronic Drum Machine.

Raspberry Pi Photobooth

First up was Pete Milne with his Raspberry Pi Photobooth. Pete connected his Pi via the USB into the camera, then using a Python Script, told the camera to take a picture.  The picture then uploads to a website and attached a unique QR Code, and those in the picture can then scan the code and transfer the pic to their phone (this last bit, Pete is still tinkering with to work properly)

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Pi Powered 3D Printer

Raspberry Jam co-host Alex Gibson has spent the last few months constructing his Raspberry Pi powered 3D Printer with the help of the Thames Valley RepRap Group.  For less than £500 you can build your own 3D printer.  Please note, Alex has not started a lego counterfitting operation in his back bedroom!, it's just an example of what you can do, its probably cheaper to buy lego, however, you can always make that custom bit you can't buy off the shelf :0) 

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Here's a quick video of it printing a "mini mug"


RasPIO

Alex ‘Raspi.TV’ Eames gave a demo of his RasPIO board.  The board supports 8 digital input and outputs, LEDs for relay outputs, analogue inputs and an onboard potentiometer input. Simple components like a temperature and light sensor can be directly plugged in and read.  This looks like it could be a great classroom project.

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Here's some video of it in action, cups of coffee are handy things...

Alex also had us playing a simple reaction speed game with two player pads with LEDs – faster finger when the LED lights wins!  If i wasn't busy taking notes, with my gamer reactions, i'm sure I could have wiped the floor with everyone... yes Alex, thats a challenge... electric shocks for the slowest... :0)

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Messaging on the Pi

In the spirit of hardware hacking, Will put together a cool little demo using an IM-me childrens texting toy re-programmed to operate as a wireless console terminal for the Pi.  Will can exchange messages from Pi to toy and toy to Pi on a low power radio link.

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Will also showed off his Radio Spectrum Analyser that he has also got running on one of these toys.  If you want to try the same, here's a blog that Andrew Back did on DesignSpark.


Solenoid Sequencer

The evening went out with a bang.... literally with Peter Andrews Solenoid Sequencer, aka a home made 16 step 4 device electronic drum machine.  Peter hooked up his Pi to his home made contraption that consisted of a tin can, bowl (bell), glass jar and jar lid, all activated by solenoids driven by the Pi and some Python Code.  Then to play a tune, he linked it up over wifi to an Android tablet. Peter has written a simple touchscreen interface in Android to set the sequence, which is basically a keyboard that allows you to play a tune!

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Here's a quick video shot by Alex "Raspi.TV" Eames, showing it in action.

Thanks to all those that took part. My apolgies for the quality of some of my images and video, as these were taken on another fruit based device as I forgot my proper camera!

Find details of your local Raspberry Jam here

4 comments

Comments

  • willnightingale Avatar willnightingale

    Posted by willnightingale at

    Hello, cheers for another Jam, great fun as usual! In the interest of credit where credit's due: The spectrum analyser is Michael Ossman's ([url]ossmann.blogspot.com/2010/03/16-pocket-spectrum-analyzer.html[/url]) and the wireless serial takes code from Joby Taffey's pinkOS ([url:28e2fpf2]http://ossmann.blogspot.co.uk/2010/03/16-pocket-spectrum-analyzer.html[/url:28e2fpf2]). One of these days I'll write it up and post my modifications, link to follow in the near future! Will

  • david tarrant Avatar david tarrant

    Posted by david tarrant at

    Great blog Pete. Looks like a fun Pi get together with lots of interesting projects.

  • pete wood Avatar pete wood

    Posted by pete wood at

    Sounds like a plan :0)

  • raspi.tv Avatar raspi.tv

    Posted by raspi.tv at

    Thanks for hosting. It was a great jam. Just putting together some RepRap footage. Electric shocks could be arranged - divert the relay feed from the fan demo. There's three spare wires on the button pads ;)

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