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Powering Electric Vehicles: Fuel-Cells and Big Batteries
Bill Marshall
13
Engineer, PhD, lecturer, freelance technical writer, blogger & tweeter interested in robots, AI, planetary explorers and all things electronic. STEM ambassador. Designed, built and programmed my first microcomputer in 1976. Still learning, still building, still coding today.

Comments

April 9, 2019 07:58

Hello Bill.
The v1 paper was titled:
Adversarial Attacks Against Medical Deep Learning Systems (15 Apr 2018), and reads differently enough.
Kind regards

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November 6, 2018 08:10

Responding to a comment on Twitter concerning fire extinguishers on electric vehicles. Great deal of confusion around about the best way to tackle 'Lithium' fires. Non-rechargeable Lithium metal batteries - those tiny 3V coin cells for instance - will react badly if broken open and exposed to water. Dry powder (Class-D) extingiushers only. Lithium-Ion batteries contain very little Lithium metal so can be dowsed with just about anything: water, foam, powder even sand. Preferably large quantities of water to cool down adjacent cells and stop them from exploding. However, if smoke suddenly starts pouring into the car the only advice is to stop, get out and call the fire brigade. If they arrive quickly and can gain access to the batteries, a flood of water may just confine the fire to a single cell and stop others exploding. Fires like this are very rare and are caused by an internal short-circuit causing massive over-heating. The other scenario is when an accidental collision physically damages one or more cells causing short-circuits. The fire in either case may prove stubborn to put out completely while short-circuits remain.
As for hydrogen fuel cells, again the best advice is to move well away from the car and call the fire-brigade!

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November 1, 2018 09:15

Power Grid would need to have support from Wind and Solar energy. Hoping in the future I rather put up solar panels on my roof and building roofs instead of tar and shingles. That would provide a large boost of energy during sunny days. The power would be localized for those electric vehicles that need to recharge in those areas.

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October 26, 2018 15:01

Don't hear too much about how the power grid is going to tolerate all the new load demands. How green is the extra power generation going to be against low emission combustion engines?

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October 26, 2018 15:02

Don't hear too much about how the power grid is going to tolerate all the new load demands. How green is the extra power generation going to be against low emission combustion engines?

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October 29, 2018 09:47

@David Woodbridge Recent research in the US suggests that fast-charging an EV battery in 10 minutes will require 300 to 400 kW of power, so several cars at a 'fueling station' will need about 1MW. Forget about 240 volts - such a facility will have to get it's electricity from the 11 or 33 kV grid! I very much doubt that the UK has, or will have, anything like enough generating capacity to handle those sorts of numbers nationwide.

October 26, 2018 15:04

Nice paper.
Stock-car- and F1-racing pit-crews know the advantages of a fire-extinguisher. I'll have to admit, that alternative fuel cells will grow the same way.

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October 26, 2018 14:38

Great article, hydrogen is my thing so I'm biased what 'the answer' should be but...

There is light at the end of the tunnel - Dr. John Bannister Goodenough, who is attributed with the invention of the lithium-ion battery, has invented its replacement based on sodium using a glass electrolyte (with the help of his team). It has much superior charging and cycle characteristics and being glass, won't short and burn if mechanically damaged. The sodium is in plentiful supply (sea water) so we don't need to waste vast swathes of China. Best of all, Dr. Goodenough released his research findings for the good of everyone at a recent TED talk. https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/news/john-bannister-goodenough-inventor-lithium-cobalt-oxide-cathode/

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October 22, 2018 13:19

Interesting article. Another significant problem with personal BEV's is the fact that some 40% of homes would require a charging lead of significant length to trail over the public highway/pavement. Such properties do not include a meaningful driveway to park a car.

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October 22, 2018 13:19

Have you heard of lithium titanate batteries these can be charged and discharge very fast and are safe they csn ne punchured with nails, crushed even shorted and do not explode, these cells are created nano technology and I see them as the answer to a lot a problems including battery life.
Crushed,

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October 26, 2018 14:37

@de-bug Yes, a number of companies are selling a Li-Ion battery where the anode has been coated with Li-titanate nanocrystals instead of carbon to massively improve electron flow. This enables much larger discharge currents and very fast charging. The downside is the cell voltage of 2.4 volts as opposed to the usual 3.7. That means the battery is much larger and heavier (more cells) for a given output than the 'normal' Li-Ion equivalent! Still, there is much on-going research in the area of battery technology and there will be other 'solutions'.

October 22, 2018 13:20

Would Carbon Capture programmes also be an alternative? They can produce carbon Neutral fuels. That way we could stick with the combustion engine for the time being and additionally reduce the carbon emission's in the atmosphere through capture. If we had enough Capture facilities. With regards to global warming, surely this is a good alternative - as mining for precious metals / mass production of a next generation of cars is just as detrimental to the Environment. Carbon Engineering (Canadian Company) seem to be pioneering this technology.

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October 26, 2018 14:37

@cgray123 Carbon Engineering's Air to Fuel concept makes great sense for a country without significant fossil fuel reserves of its own, but I doubt whether it will have much impact on atmospheric CO2 levels. After all, the process captures carbon only to have it quickly released again when the fuel is used. There is in fact a cost - the energy used and stored by the conversion process itself which then reappears as the fuel burns.

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