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Blogs about Design Phase

Blogs about Design Phase

  • Is Number Five really Alive? (Number One is still pretty Dumb)

    Bill Marshall

    Finally, after months of late nights working in the lab, this collection of servomotors, microcontrollers and bits of bent metal is ready to come alive. All it needs now is a brain to give it intelligence, to allow it to think for itself, to operate autonomously: to be a robot. But what is ‘intelligence’ and can it be programmed in computer code? I have a ‘Smart’ phone, but what does ‘Smart’ mean? One thing’s for sure, a lot of research is required just to work out where to start.

      1751 views

    • David Taylor, DesignSpark PCB Review

      DSpark PCB

      We recently released the sixth update to this powerful software, adding in new functionality and making significant improvements across the board. If you are yet to try our powerful free design tool, David Taylor an amateur inventor and rookie PCB designer has written a great in-depth account of starting out with the software.

        2971 views

      • A Nano-amp Probe Capable of Validating Low Power MCU Consumption Claims.

        mixedsigmark

        In the mid 1980s, it was unusual to find semiconductors operating at supply currents below milliamp levels. Rarely was efficiency a major design consideration either. Back then, several tools suited the task of measuring current draw. However, with the advances made in the last three decades, combined with a global drive to increasing system efficiencies powered by the drive to portable electronics, many more products are now capable of operating at miserly micro and nano-amp current levels – that's at levels as much as a million times lower than were typical 30 years ago.

          1940 views

        • PocketQube: CubeSat’s Little Brother

          Bill Marshall

          In April 2012 I posted a DesignSpark blog post on the launch into Earth orbit of tiny, cheap Nanosat satellites built to a standard pattern called a CubeSat. Thanks to the miniaturisation of electronics the format is one of a 10cm cube. Femtosats are even smaller: one design, called a PocketQube, is basically a 5cm cube and eight would fit inside a CubeSat. Surely a step too far?

            3793 views